Ο πόλεμος που θα τελείωνε όλους τους πολέμους

War and Peace

On the morning of the World War I armistice, Nov. 11, 1918, American fighter ace Eddie Rickenbacker took off against orders and made his way to the front. He arrived at Verdun at 10:45 and flew out over the no-man’s-land between the armies. Less than 500 feet off the ground, “I could see both Germans and Americans crouching in their trenches, peering over with every intention of killing any man who revealed himself on the other side.”

I glanced at my watch. One minute to 11:00, thirty seconds, fifteen. And then it was 11:00 a.m. the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. I was the only audience for the greatest show ever presented. On both sides of no-man’s land, the trenches erupted. Brown-uniformed men poured out of the American trenches, gray-green uniforms out of the German. From my observer’s seat overhead, I watched them throw their helmets in the air, discard their guns, wave their hands. Then all up and down the front, the two groups of men began edging toward each other across no-man’s-land. Seconds before they had been willing to shoot each other; now they came forward. Hesitantly at first, then more quickly, each group approached the other.

Suddenly gray uniforms mixed with brown. I could see them hugging each other, dancing, jumping. Americans were passing out cigarettes and chocolate. I flew up to the French sector. There it was even more incredible. After four years of slaughter and hatred, they were not only hugging each other but kissing each other on both cheeks as well.

Star shells, rockets and flares began to go up, and I turned my ship toward the field. The war was over.

(From his autobiography.)
 

daeman

Moderator
Staff member
...
Μαρίνο, θα έλεγα «σαπό», αλλά μου φαίνεται φτωχό γι' αυτό που με πλημμύρισε μόλις το διάβασα, πρώτο ανάγνωσμα της ημέρας. Κι όχι μόνο μέσα μου, αλλά ξέσπασε κιόλας, εκτονώθηκε, το καλύτερο βάλσαμο για την ξηροφθαλμία που με ταλαιπωρούσε μεσημεριάτικα. Ευχαριστώ σε από καρδιάς, και το καλό που μου 'καμες, εσύ κι ο Ρικενμπάκερ, εύχομαι να το βρεις μπροστά σου.

Όμως, δαεμάνος ων, όταν συγκινούμαι κι ανεβαίνει ο κόμπος στο λαιμό, αναλαμβάνει το δαιμόνιο να με συνεφέρει, πάντα με κατεργάρικη διάθεση, οπότε θυμήθηκε μια όχι άσχετη σκηνή που εσύ τουλάχιστον ξέρεις από παλιά, ένα μικρό αντίδωρο:


Πολεμούσαμε απ' το βράδυ ως το πρωί
τατζούμ, παπατζούμ
από δω εμείς, από κει και οι εχθροί
Κι ούτε νερό, εν-δυο, ούτε ψωμί, τρία-τέσσερα,
ούτε νερό, ούτε ψωμί, ούτε φαΐ
Βασιλιάς, πατρίς, θρησκεία μάς οδηγεί
πλημμύρισε από αίμα όλη η γη

Με ψυχή!
Να όμως που το άλλο βράδυ φτάνει
αρκετοί 'ναι οι νεκροί
μας σφίγγει μια σωματική ανάγκη
δεν παίρνει αναβολή
Τα όπλα παρατάμε
και πίσω από τους θάμνους πάμε
το ίδιο κι οι εχθροί
κι ακολουθούν κι οι αξιωματικοί

Με καρδιά
Τώρα όλα πήγανε στο βρόντο
πατρίς, θρησκεία, βασιλιάς
κι έμεινε ο κυρ-πόλεμος στον τόπο
σαν απόπληκτος μπαμπάς

Έγινε ειρήνη για λόγους ανωτέρας βίας
ας κράταγε αλήθεια για όλη τη μικρή ζωή μας

Με ψυχή!
 
Έχουμε μιλήσει για το στρατόπεδο αιχμαλώτων του Γκαίρλιτς εδώ; Οι περίφημες ηχογραφήσεις τραγουδιών και διαλέκτων που έκανε η Πρωσική Βασιλική Ακαδημία μεταξύ των Ελλήνων στρατιωτών πρόκειται να κυκλοφορήσουν σύντομα από τις Πανεπιστημιακές Εκδόσεις Κρήτης. Με την ευκαιρία, ας αφήσω εδώ μερικά χρήσιμα λινκ:
http://matiesmagazine.blogspot.gr/2009/02/blog-post_9668.html (γενική επισκόπηση)
http://www.paradoxon-klangorchester.de/paramithi/arthra/kato-o-polemos.html και http://www.paradoxon-klangorchester.de/paramithi/arthra/kato-o-polemos-2.html (το ημερολόγιο ενός αιχμάλωτου φαντάρου)

Για όσους αγαπάνε την κλασική (λόγια τέλος πάντων) μουσική του 20ού αιώνα, αιχμάλωτος στο Γκαίρλιτς (έναν πόλεμο αργότερα, το '41) έγραψε και ο Ολιβιέ Μεσιάν το "Κουαρτέτο για το τέλος του χρόνου":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeSVu1zbF94
 

drsiebenmal

HandyMod
Staff member
Έχουμε μιλήσει για το στρατόπεδο αιχμαλώτων του Γκαίρλιτς εδώ;
Ήμουν βέβαιος ότι έχω γράψει κάτι και μάλιστα εκτενές, αλλά δεν το βρίσκω. Θα ήταν κάπου αλλού*, τρέχα γύρευε πού... :(

Για όσους αγαπάνε την κλασική (λόγια τέλος πάντων) μουσική του 20ού αιώνα, αιχμάλωτος στο Γκαίρλιτς (έναν πόλεμο αργότερα, το '41) έγραψε και ο Ολιβιέ Μεσιάν το "Κουαρτέτο για το τέλος του χρόνου":
Όσο γι' αυτό, προφανώς δεν διάβασες ακόμα αυτό ;) για το βιβλίο, που περιέχει συναρπαστική περιγραφή της ιστορίας του Μεσιάν.



* Ένα βρήκα εδώ, στο 40κέικο, αλλά ίσως έχει κι άλλα, αλλού, επειδή είχα ασχοληθεί αρκετά με το θέμα τότε... :(
 
Ήμουν βέβαιος ότι έχω γράψει κάτι και μάλιστα εκτενές, αλλά δεν το βρίσκω. Θα ήταν κάπου αλλού, τρέχα γύρευε πού... :(
Εκτενές δεν ξέρω, αλλά βρήκα μερικά σύντομα σχόλια στου Σαραντάκου προ αμνημονεύτων ;)

Όσο για το Orfeo, να κάτι που μου είχε εντελώς ξεφύγει! :)
 

drsiebenmal

HandyMod
Staff member
Cher Ami, ένας ήρωας των αιθέρων


To American school children of the 1920s and 1930s, Cher Ami was as well known as any human World War I heroes.

Cher Ami was a homing pigeon who had been donated by the pigeon fanciers of Britain for use by the U.S. Army Signal Corps in France during World War I, and had been trained by American pigeoneers. She helped save the Lost Battalion of the 77th Division in the Battle of the Argonne, October 1918.

On October 3, 1918, Major Charles White Whittlesey and more than 500 men were trapped in a small depression on the side of the hill behind enemy lines without food or ammunition.

They were also beginning to receive friendly fire from allied troops who did not know their location. Surrounded by the Germans, many were killed and wounded on the first day and by the second day, just over 190 men were still alive. Whittlesey dispatched messages by pigeon.

The pigeon carrying the first message, “Many wounded. We cannot evacuate.” was shot down. A second bird was sent with the message, “Men are suffering. Can support be sent?” That pigeon also was shot down. Only one homing pigeon was left: “Cher
Ami”. She was dispatched with a note in a canister on her left leg,

“We are along the road parallel to 276.4. Our own artillery is dropping a barrage directly on us. For heaven’s sake, stop it.”​

As Cher Ami tried to fly back home, the Germans saw her rising out of the brush and opened fire. For several moments, Cher Ami flew with bullets zipping through the air all around her. Cher Ami was eventually shot down but managed to take flight again.
She arrived back at her loft at division headquarters 25 miles to the rear in just 25 minutes, helping to save the lives of the 194 survivors. In this last mission, Cher Ami delivered the message despite having been shot through the breast, blinded in one eye, covered in blood and with a leg hanging only by a tendon.

Cher Ami became the hero of the 77th Infantry Division. Army medics worked long and hard to save her life. They were unable to salvage her leg, so they carved a small wooden one for her. When she recovered enough to travel, the now one-legged bird was put on a boat to the United States, with General John J. Pershing personally seeing Cher Ami off as she departed France.
 

Attachments

  • cherami.JPG
    cherami.JPG
    80.5 KB · Views: 103

daeman

Moderator
Staff member
Μια που ανέφερες τα ζώα του πολέμου, μια απίθανη ιστορία που έμαθα προχτές το βράδυ:

Cher Ami (French for "dear friend", in the masculine) was a female homing pigeon who had been donated by the pigeon fanciers of Britain for use by the U.S. Army Signal Corps in France during World War I and had been trained by American pigeoneers. She helped save the Lost Battalion of the 77th Division in the Battle of the Argonne, October 1918.
...


...

Επειδή αναφέρεται στη συμπαθητική ταινία Flying Home(όχι χολιγουντιανιά, ευρωπαϊκή αλλά χωρίς την υπερβολική αφαίρεση κι ομφαλοσκόπηση που δέρνει μερικές ευρωπαϊκές, ένα ευνόητα προβλέψιμο ρομαντικό ψιλομελόδραμα) του Βέλγου Ντόμινικ Ντερούντερε (η οποία κούρνιασε για λίγο στα χέρια μου και την επιμελήθηκα κατάλληλα), όπου ο πρωταγωνιστής ψάχνει τον τάφο του προπάππου του που σκοτώθηκε στη Φλάνδρα στον Α΄ΠΠ
...

12-11-2014, mon cher ami. :-)
 

daeman

Moderator
Staff member
...
Να όμως που το άλλο βράδυ φτάνει
αρκετοί 'ναι οι νεκροί
μας σφίγγει μια σωματική ανάγκη
δεν παίρνει αναβολή
Τα όπλα παρατάμε
και πίσω από τους θάμνους πάμε
το ίδιο κι οι εχθροί
κι ακολουθούν κι οι αξιωματικοί

Τώρα όλα πήγανε στο βρόντο
πατρίς, θρησκεία, βασιλιάς
κι έμεινε ο κυρ-πόλεμος στον τόπο
σαν απόπληκτος μπαμπάς

Έγινε ειρήνη για λόγους ανωτέρας βίας
ας κράταγε αλήθεια για όλη τη μικρή ζωή μας

With the revolution in chaos and a warrant issued for his own arrest as a Fascist — the side he had been fighting against for the previous six months — George Orwell fled Spain on this day in 1937. To preserve his pose as a tourist, Orwell left without his notebooks, but he would write about his experiences in Homage to Catalonia and in a series of essays over the next decade. In “Looking Back on the Spanish War,” Orwell goes beyond his specific arguments in favor of the Republican cause (and socialism in general) to make several broader points. One is that atrocities and cover-ups always occur, on all sides. Another is the reminder that war, as viewed from ground level, is about food, latrines and horror: “Bullets hurt, corpses stink, men under fire are often so frightened that they wet their trousers.” As if footnote to that, he recalls one night at the Front when he and another had crawled out into No Man’s Land — a 300-yard wide beet field with little cover — to snipe at the enemy, and been caught by the dawn:

"We were still trying to nerve ourselves to make a dash for it when there was an uproar and a blowing of whistles in the Fascist trench. Some of our aeroplanes were coming over. At this moment, a man presumably carrying a message to an officer, jumped out of the trench and ran along the top of the parapet in full view. He was half-dressed and was holding up his trousers with both hands as he ran…. It is true that I am a poor shot and unlikely to hit a running man at a hundred yards, and also that I was thinking chiefly about getting back to our trench while the Fascists had their attention fixed on the aeroplanes. Still, I did not shoot partly because of that detail about the trousers. I had come here to shoot at ‘Fascists’; but a man who is holding up his trousers isn’t a ‘Fascist’, he is visibly a fellow-creature, similar to yourself, and you don’t feel like shooting at him."

https://www.facebook.com/GeorgeOrwe...4373627724679/760634574098578/?type=3&theater
 
O ελληνικός τίτλος του μαγαζιού πρέπει να είναι Βερδέν (ΒΕΡΔΕΝ). Και οι εφημερίδες της εποχής συνήθως Βερδέν το έγραφαν.
 

Zazula

Administrator
Staff member
O ελληνικός τίτλος του μαγαζιού πρέπει να είναι Βερδέν (ΒΕΡΔΕΝ). Και οι εφημερίδες της εποχής συνήθως Βερδέν το έγραφαν.
Ναι, σωστά, «το Βερδέν». Διορθώνω.
 
Last edited:

SBE

¥
Και βλέπω σερβίρει English Breakfasts.
Ως άξιος πρόγονος όλων των τιμοκαταλόγων και επιγραφών της σύγχρονης τουριστικής Ελλάδας.
 
estiatorio-verden.jpg

Ιδού μια απείραχτη φώτο. Στην ταμπέλα αριστερά πάντως, λέει "ΕΣΤΙΑΤΟΡΙΟΝ το ΒΕΡΔΕΝ".
 

drsiebenmal

HandyMod
Staff member
Και βλέπω σερβίρει English Breakfasts.
Ως άξιος πρόγονος όλων των τιμοκαταλόγων και επιγραφών της σύγχρονης τουριστικής Ελλάδας.

Και το Српска Куιна λάθος μοιάζει, μάλλον Кухиња θα έπρεπε να είναι...
 
Top